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C'mon now! That's just horrible, man.

Joyful white guys finish ahead of
struggling woman and black man in this university’s catalog

Image in the brochure for the University of North Georgia. In this accurate analogy for the hiring
and tenure process at most HWCUs, we can see a white male, in this case Bill, winning. Those
diversity hires never seem to come in first. The reasons are...complicated.
From an article describing the brouhaha around the image above, via the Facebook Diversity in Astronomy and Physics page:
The University of North Georgia apologized and agreed to stop distributing a course catalog that shows white men winning a race while a woman and black man lag behind.
Because...because of course. Because white, male privilege. Because this is the most honest take on University policy ever distributed by a Historically White College or University (HWCUs as I all them). I hear a picture of the starting line was considered for the brochure, but removed simply because the development office "needed more space for buzz words like 'cross-cutting' and 'diversity'." Fortunately, I was able to locate the infographic showing the starting line:





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