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Sadly, Prop 19 didn't pass in Tuesday's election. Score one for the old drug warriors and failed drug policy. But I'm encouraged because A) we're having this conversation B) the process led to a lighter punishment for possession (misdemeanor down from possible prison term) and C) it didn't lose by much. Losing by a 4-point swing isn't bad for an initiative that every major CA newspaper was against (see my LA Times review). Plus, the prohibitionists got their chance to roll out their best arguments and, well, they looked pretty silly in the process.

In better news, Prop 23 failed. I didn't post about this evil little initiative, but I'm glad it's gone. Basically, two Texas oil companies pushed to have clean air laws rolled back. "We're all about clean air," they said. "But let's roll back the laws just until unemployment drops below 5.4% for four straight quarters. Jobs and stuff!" In other words, let's just suspend sensible environmental laws until unemployment drops to a level it's only been three times since 1980, for a period of time that we've seen in, um, never. Or until pigs fly, whichever comes first. The voters saw through that lame idea.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Glad California voters saw through the lameness on the air quality laws. We (as in, the voters, not me specifically since I did not vote for him) just voted in a new governor in Florida that is threatening to do much the same with our environmental regulations. Working in the industry, I find this cringe-worthy. Yes, there's a lot of regulation, but sometimes that's a good thing when it is helping the environment and your citizens' quality of life.

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